Diagnosis Test

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Diagnosis Test
Some diagnostic tests are parts of a simple physical examination which require only simple tools in the hands of a skilled practitioner, and can be performed in an office environment. Some other tests require elaborate equipment used by medical technologists or the use of a sterile operating theatre environment.

Laboratory test
If you've ever had to give a tube of blood or a little cup of urine in your doctor's office, you've had a laboratory test. Laboratory tests check a sample of your blood, urine or body tissues. A technician or your doctor analyzes the test samples to see if your results fall within the normal range. The tests use a range because what is normal differs from person to person. Many factors affect test results.

X-rays
You've probably had an X-ray examination of some part of your body. Health care professionals use them to look for broken bones, problems in your lungs and abdomen, cavities in your teeth and many other problems.X-ray examination is painless, fast and easy. The amount of radiation exposure you receive during an X-ray examination is small.

Pap smear
A Pap smear is a microscopic examination of cells scraped from the opening of the cervix. The cervix is the lower part of the uterus (womb) that opens at the top of the vagina.

It is a screening test for cervical cancer. The Pap smear is a screening test for cervical cancer. Most cervical cancers can be detected early if women has routine Pap smears and pelvic examinations.

Screening should start at age 21. After the first test:

Woman should have a Pap smear ever 2 years to check for cervical cancer. If you are over age 30 or your Pap smears have been negative for 3 times in a row, your doctor may tell you that you only need a Pap smear every 3 years. If you or your sexual partner have other new partners, then you should have a Pap smear every 2 years. After age 65-70, most women can stop having Pap smears as long as they have had three negative tests within the past 10 years. If you have a new sexual partner after age 65, you should begin having Pap smear screening again. You may not need to have a Pap smear if you have had a total hysterectomy (uterus and cervix removed) and do not have a history of cervical dysplasia (abnormal cells), cervical cancer, or other pelvic cancer.

Ultrasound
Ultrasound( also called sonogram) uses high-frequency sound waves to look at organs and structures inside the body. Health care professionals use them to view the heart, blood vessels, kidneys, liver and other organs. During pregnancy, doctors use ultrasound tests to examine the fetus. Unlike x-rays, ultrasound does not involve exposure to radiation.

During an ultrasound test, a special technician or doctor moves a device called a transducer over part of your body. The transducer sends out sound waves, which bounce off the tissues inside your body. The transducer also captures the waves that bounce back. Images are created from these sound waves.

Electrocardiograms
An electrocardiogram, also called an EKG or ECG, is a simple, painless test that records the heart's electrical activity. To understand this test, it helps to understand how the heart works.

With each heartbeat, an electrical signal spreads from the top of the heart to the bottom. As it travels, the signal causes the heart to contract and pump blood. The process repeats with each new heartbeat.